Museums and the Web

An annual conference exploring the social, cultural, design, technological, economic, and organizational issues of culture, science and heritage on-line.

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alewis's picture

Mixing It Up: Developing and Implementing a Tagging System for a Content-Rich Website Which Uses Aggregated Content from Multiple Sources

Andrew Lewis, Victoria and Albert Museum, United Kingdom

http://beta.vam.ac.uk

Abstract

In 2009, the Victoria and Albert Museum website had a very large amount of in-depth content including museum content and user-generated features. This presented a challenge in connecting users with site content that they may not have been aware of. In January 2011, the Museum made live a beta version of its redesigned website which aimed to address this issue. The new site moved away from a hierarchical navigation model to a dynamic concept-driven one. This aimed to collect and present content relevant to the user's subject of interest. A central method in achieving this was the development of a tagging system to classify Web content so that it would aggregate as required. This paper looks at the reality of developing and implementing a bespoke tagging system that could be effective for users yet simple enough to use for staff who are not specialist classifiers. The human issues for staff in developing the system are discussed, with some early results and feedback from the early beta-testing period. It is hoped the paper will offer insight into what happens in practice when using tagging for real on a live website.

Keywords: tagging, content, staff, classification, management

Susan Cairns's picture

Tag! You're It! What Value Do Folksonomies Bring To The Online Museum Collection?

Susan Cairns, The University of Newcastle, Australia

Abstract

As growing numbers of museums invite users to digitally tag online collection objects with key words, it is timely to examine the value that this practice can bring to the sector. These tags in their aggregate are known as ëfolksonomiesí and are broad user-derived classifications that are, at their heart, a form of communication (Huang & Chuang, 2009). As a collaborative process with no hierarchical structure (Cameron & Mengler, 2009), folksonomies stand in opposition to traditional museum taxonomies, and present museums with new opportunities for gaining insight into, and interacting with, audiences. Further, through recording evolving language and tag behaviour, folksonomies have the potential to become autonomously important to the museum in its study of people and written historical documentation. This conceptual paper will present an exploratory examination of the value that folksonomies provide to the museum and gallery sector in the digital age. It will demonstrate that incorporating folksonomies with traditional taxonomic museum classification systems provides the museum with an important new way through which to maintain and grow its relevance in the digital age.

Keywords: folksonomies, museum documentation, social media, tagging, taxonomy

mia's picture

Playing with Difficult Objects – Game Designs to Improve Museum Collections

Mia Ridge, Science Museum, United Kingdom

http://museumgam.es/

Abstract

Crowdsourcing the creation, correction or enhancement of data about objects through games is an attractive proposition for museums looking to maximize use of their collections online without committing intensive curatorial resources to enhancing catalogue records. This paper investigates the optimum game designs to encourage participation and the generation of useful data through a case study of the project Museum Metadata Games that successfully designed games that created improved metadata for 'difficult' objects from two science and history museum collections.

Keywords: collections, games, crowdsourcing, objects, metadata, tagging

Tagging

Type: 
Session
Date & Time: 
Apr 7 2011 - 1:00pm
Location: 
Commonwealth A/B

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Archives & Museum Informatics EIN: 77-0708617; GST / BN 887978914

Description

Words, words, words. Whose words, why words, how words? Tags are just language but who assigns them, how and where, in in what relations to existing description is all critical to understanding, and ultimately to using, tags. In this session tagging discussion advances from art to science.

Mixing it up: Experiences of managing and displaying aggregated content from multiple sources, combining editorial selection, subject classification using tagging and automated retrieval.

Keywords: 
tagging
Keywords: 
dynamic Web site
Keywords: 
Web content
Keywords: 
subject classification
Keywords: 
staff
Abstract: 

In January 2011, the Victoria and Albert Museum will relaunch its website, with a new design based upon a radically different approach to content which will make users the central focus of the site. It will do this by moving from a static hierarchical navigation structure to a dynamic concept-driven site which will gather the available content relevant to a user’s subject of interest.

Type: 
Paper - in formal session
Authors: 

Tag! You’re It! What value do folksonomies bring to the online museum collection?

Keywords: 
taxonomies
Keywords: 
online collections
Keywords: 
collections documentation
Keywords: 
meaning-making
Keywords: 
folksonomies
Keywords: 
tagging
Abstract: 

As growing numbers of museums invite users to digitally tag online collection objects with key words, it is timely to examine the value that this practice can bring to the sector.

Type: 
Paper - in formal session
Authors: 

Computational Linguistics in Museums: Applications for Cultural Datasets

Keywords: 
collection access
Keywords: 
steve.museum
Keywords: 
tagging
Keywords: 
computational linguistics
Keywords: 
text processing
Keywords: 
cultural data
Abstract: 

As museums continue to develop more sophisticated techniques for managing and analyzing cultural data, many are beginning to encounter challenges when trying to deal with the nuances of language and automated processing tools.  How might user-generated comments be harvested and processed to determine the nature of the comment?  Is it possible to use existing collection documentation t

Type: 
Paper - in formal session

The Generative Web

Bearman, D., & Trant J. (2006).  The Generative Web. Museums and the Web 2006.