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You are hereThe Academic Library's Role in Transmitting Cultural Heritage Using 21st Century Technology: the University of Arizona Libraries and the Cultural Comm

The Academic Library's Role in Transmitting Cultural Heritage Using 21st Century Technology: the University of Arizona Libraries and the Cultural Comm


TitleThe Academic Library's Role in Transmitting Cultural Heritage Using 21st Century Technology: the University of Arizona Libraries and the Cultural Comm
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2001
AuthorsNorlin, E., Glogoff S., Morris P., & Forger G.
Secondary TitleInternational Cultural Heritage Informatics Meeting: Proceedings from ichim01
PublisherArchives & Museum Informatics
Place PublishedMilano, Italy / Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
EditorBearman, D., & Garzotto F.
Keywordsichim, ICHIM01
Abstract

University libraries are in the forefront in utilizing and experimenting with innovative technologies to serve the teaching and research needs of their user communities. These same organizations have a wonderful array of special collections that highlight the local, regional and sometimes the national cultural heritage of not only our ethnically diverse citizens but also places and things. This intersection of the application of 21st century technology and the transmission of cultural heritage has created new venues for distribution and avenues for access to these visual, audio and video cultural treasures. The collaboration between the library and its community serves as a model for blending different areas of expertise and approaches to disseminate an area's cultural heritage. This presentation features one of the most representative projects, Through Our Parents' Eyes: Tucson's Diverse Community. The digital objects within Through Our Parents' Eyes are being indexed in a searchable database constructed around the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative and should be compatible with evolving standards, such as the Open Archives Metadata Harvesting Protocol (OAMH). These digital objects include images of photo slides, historical artifacts and streaming audio and video. The current exhibits include web sites devoted to the cultural heritage of Mexican Americans, African Americans, Chinese Americans, Native Americans and the Pioneer Jewish Experience. Through Our Parents' Eyes may be viewed at http://www.library.arizona.edu/parents/

URLhttp://www.archimuse.com/publishing/ichim01_vol1/morris.pdf