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Teamwork & the Museum Interactive: First Experience with the Hybrid Model at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art


TitleTeamwork & the Museum Interactive: First Experience with the Hybrid Model at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication1995
AuthorsSamis, P.
Secondary TitleHands On: Hypermedia & Interactivity in Museums: Selected Papers from the Third International Conference on Hypermedia and Interactivity in Museums: Volume 2 (ICHIM 95 / MCN 95)
PublisherArchives & Museum Informatics
Place PublishedSan Diego, California
EditorBearman, D.
Keywordsin-house exhibition strategy, interactive on-site, multimedia in house, museum strategy, new media
Abstract

The San Francisco Museum of Modem Art moved into its new home a modernist palace designed by Swiss architect Mario Bottain July of 1994, and opened to the public in January of this year. The move represented far more than a change of venue: the entire perception and profile of the Museum on a local, national, and international scale were redefined. In the past, annual attendance was on the order of 225,000; suddenly, in the first year of the new building, it has tripled. Located adjacent to downtown and next door to the convention center, we have suddenly become a de rigueur tourist destination, and a source of civic pride to many local residents who may never before knew we existed. It was in anticipation of this vast increase in our visiting public, and in the desire to aid them in their approach to the often challenging works that are the province of a modem and contemporary art museum, that the Museum undertook a New Technologies Initiative, comprising educational programs running on multimedia computers and CD-based audio tours. Following enabling grants of funds and equipment from the James Irvine Foundation and Apple Computer, I was promoted from my longtime position as interdepartmental Curatorial Assistant to a newly created position, Program Manager for Interactive Educational Technologies and Assistant Curator of ducat ion.' Given a six-month initial timeline, an adequate but not ample budget, and the lack of other available personnel, the task was to formulate and implement a strategy that would lead to the timely development of three different multimedia programs, and nurture a budding in-house multimedia expertiseperhaps even an infrastructure. In this paper I shall discuss the strategy we developed, the flaws that surfaced in the heat of multimedia production, and the preliminary lessons we are drawing from our experience.

URLhttp://www.archimuse.com/publishing/ichim95_vol2/samis.pdf