Museums and the Web

An annual conference exploring the social, cultural, design, technological, economic, and organizational issues of culture, science and heritage on-line.

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Natasha Waterson's picture

Delightfully Lost: A New Kind of Wayfinding at Kew

Natasha Waterson and Mike Saunders, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, United Kingdom

www.kew.org

Abstract

In October 2010, Kew Gardens commissioned an in-depth study of visitors’ motivations and information needs around its 300-acre site, with the express aim that it should guide the development of new mobile apps. The work involved over 1,500 visitor-tracking observations, 350 mini-interviews, 200 detailed exit interviews, and 85 fulfilment maps; and gave Kew an incredibly useful insight into its visitors’ wants, needs, and resulting behaviours.

It turns out that most Kew visitors have social, emotional, and spiritual, rather than intellectual, motivations during their time here. They do not come hoping to find out more, and they don’t want or need to know precisely where they are all the time. In fact, they love the sense of unguided exploration and the serendipitous discoveries they make at Kew—they want to become “delightfully lost.”

SDNHM Tour and Digitization Discussion

Keywords: 
tour
Keywords: 
museum
Keywords: 
science
Keywords: 
natural history
Abstract: 

San Diego Natural History Museum

Type: 
Other Interaction - describe in notes
Authors: 

Delightfully lost: a new kind of wayfinding at Kew

Keywords: 
mobile
Keywords: 
audience research
Keywords: 
apps
Keywords: 
evaluation
Keywords: 
science
Keywords: 
wayfinding
Keywords: 
botanic garden
Abstract: 

In October 2010, Kew Gardens commissioned an in-depth study of visitors’ motivations and information needs around its 300 acre site, with the express aim that it should guide the development of new mobile apps.

Type: 
Paper - in formal session

Hot Button Issues: Science, Technology, Topicality & Uncertainty in Museum Exhibits

Keywords: 
complexity
Keywords: 
science
Keywords: 
students
Keywords: 
topicality
Keywords: 
controversy
Keywords: 
emergence
Abstract: 

How can museum technologists and multimedia designers partner with researchers and content specialists to communicate cutting-edge science to public audiences? Advances in communication and multimedia technologies offer new possibilities for developing exhibits that are not only more engaging to audiences but that are also updateable and that layer information.

Type: 
Demonstration - show your project
Authors: 
foeromeo's picture

Bringing Citizen Scientists and Historians Together

Fiona Romeo and Lucinda Blaser, National Maritime Museum, United Kingdom

http://www.oldweather.org | http://www.solarstormwatch.com

Abstract

This paper outlines how citizen science projects Solar Stormwatch and Old Weather play to the potentially different motivations of science and history enthusiasts. It draws on informal feedback from the forums and other social channels but also references well-documented crowdsourcing projects Galaxy Zoo and the Australian Newspapers Digitisation Program. It concludes with recommendations for attracting both lightweight contributions and sustained collaboration in online volunteering projects.

Keywords: citizen science, crowdsourcing, digitisation, communities, science, history

Tour 1: Science Museum New Media

Type: 
Tour
Tech Level: 
all
Date & Time: 
Apr 5 2011 - 8:15am
Location: 
offsite

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Archives & Museum Informatics EIN: 77-0708617; GST / BN 887978914

Description

Three important early 19th century science museums within a few blocks of each other in Center City Philadelphia are meeting their audiences in new ways in the 21st century.

Bringing citizen scientists and historians together

Keywords: 
citizen science
Keywords: 
crowdsourcing
Keywords: 
motivations
Keywords: 
history
Keywords: 
science
Keywords: 
transcription
Abstract: 

The National Maritime Museum invited the Naval-History.net community to join the Zooniverse citizen science platform to help extract meteorological data from historic ship logs. The data generated via the Old Weather website will be used by scientists at the Met Office to build better climate models.

Type: 
Paper - in formal session