Museums and the Web

An annual conference exploring the social, cultural, design, technological, economic, and organizational issues of culture, science and heritage on-line.

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sbeasley's picture

Digital Media In Everyday Life: A Snapshot of Devices, Behaviors, and Attitudes Part 1: Mobile Device Ownership

Steven Beasley and Annie Conway, Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, USA

http://msichicago.org/digitallife

Abstract

ebachta's picture

Evaluating the Practical Applications of Eye Tracking in Museums

Edward Bachta, Robert J. Stein, Silvia Filippini-Fantoni, Tiffany Leason, Indianapolis Museum of Art, USA

Abstract

Funded by an Institute for Museum and Library Services Sparks! Ignition grant, the Indianapolis Museum of Art is exploring whether or not eye-tracking technology can be useful to museums seeking to better understand how in-gallery visitors actually “see” the objects in our collection. Through a set of three experiments, the project seeks to understand whether eye tracking can be used to measure visitor attention to artworks, understand the correlation between guided interpretation and visitor comprehension, and to trigger interpretive content delivery. In this paper, authors will review the relevant literature in the field that connects gaze detection and cognition; explain in detail the experimental methodology used in the first experiment to determine the practicality of adopting these techniques in museums; and report on initial conditions and factors discovered during the project’s initial research.

dannybirchall's picture

Levelling Up: Towards Best Practice in Evaluating Museum Games

Danny Birchall and Martha Henson Wellcome Trust; Alexandra Burch and Daniel Evans, Science Museum, UK; Kate Haley Goldman, National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Center, USA

Abstract

Museums make games because games can provide compelling educational engagement with museum themes and content, and the market for games is enormous. Truly understanding whether games are achieving your goals requires evaluation. In this paper, we identify the kind of games that museums make and use case studies of our own casual games to look at the benefits and means of evaluation. Beginning by identifying different kinds of evaluation within the broad framework of formative and summative practices, we suggest ways to plan an evaluation strategy and set objectives for your game. We then look in detail at evaluation methods: paper and wireframe testing, play-testing, soft launching, Google Analytics, surveys, and analysing responses “in the wild.” While we draw on our own experience for examples of best practice, we recognize that this is an area in which everyone has a lot to learn, and we conclude by suggesting some tactics for sharing knowledge across the museums’ sector.

Beyond Cool: Making Mobile Augmented Reality Work for Museum Education

Keywords: 
digital learning
Keywords: 
mobile devices
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research
Keywords: 
study
Keywords: 
education
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education
Keywords: 
teenagers
Abstract: 

***PLEASE NOTE THIS IS AN INDIVIDUAL PAPER PROPOSAL, NOT A DEMONSTRATION.

Type: 
Paper - in formal session
Authors: 
Timothy Hart's picture

The Trade in Digital: Partnerships and Collaboration in the Content Economy

Timothy Hart, Director Information, Multimedia and Technology, Museum Victoria, Australia

Abstract

In our massively connected world content is indeed king and museums if they take a close look, will find themselves, well placed to deliver highly sought after content to an ever expanding audience. Collaboration is emerging as the critical enabler in taking full advantage of the opportunities now available for the delivery of museum online content. Collaboration needs to be both internal and external. The number and quality of national data services now operating is making museum content available for researchers and the public in numbers and types unimaginable only a few years ago. The ground work is laid in most large museums to allow them to participate in providing access to the full range and wonder possible in museum generated content.

Keywords: collaboration, collections, content, data, partnerships, opportunity, economy, research, Australia

Grounding Digital Information Trends

Keywords: 
mobiles
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social media
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internet applications - statistics
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usage data
Keywords: 
technology impact
Keywords: 
museum impact
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research
Keywords: 
augmented reality
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Pew Internet and American Life
Abstract: 

The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project provides data on the rise of mobile internet, the increasing popularity of handheld devices such as cell phones, tablet computers and e-readers, the emergence of social media, and the move towards augmented realities that can help us identify how those trends are shaping the way content-oriented organizations like museums interact w

Type: 
Paper - in formal session
Authors: 

Teylers Universe

Keywords: 
research
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Enlightenment
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Michelangelo
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Teyler
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Unesco
Keywords: 
18th century
Abstract: 

Teylers Universe is dedicated to the first half century (1784-1826) of Teylers Museum in Haarlem: the first and oldest public museum in the Netherlands. The purpose of the website is to establish digital cross-references between the various collections (Art, Paleontology, Mineralogy, Numismatics and Scientific Instruments).

Type: 
Demonstration - show your project
Authors: 

Opening Plenary

Type: 
Session
Theme: 
plenary
Date & Time: 
Apr 7 2011 - 9:00am
Location: 
Commonwealth A/B/C/D

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Archives & Museum Informatics EIN: 77-0708617; GST / BN 887978914

Description

We'll kick off MW2011 together with a plenary speaker highlighting current questions.

We're delighted to welcome Kristin Purcell of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project.

Art & Artists

Keywords: 
art
Keywords: 
collection
Keywords: 
database
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Interface
Keywords: 
research
Keywords: 
collections online
Abstract: 

This paper describes how multiple strands of exploratory thinking across a large organisation were brought together in the complete overhaul of Tate’s collection online.

Type: 
Paper - in formal session
Authors: 

Playing with museums - game designs to improve museum collections

Keywords: 
crowdsourcing
Keywords: 
games
Keywords: 
evaluation
Keywords: 
research
Keywords: 
collections
Abstract: 

Crowdsourcing data through games is an attractive proposition for museums looking to maximise use of their collections online without the requirement to commit intensive curatorial resources to enhancing catalogue records.  This paper investigates the optimum game designs to encourage participation and the generation of useful data.

Further detail

Type: 
Paper - in formal session
Authors: 

Going Mobile? Insights into the museum community’s perspectives on mobile interpretation

Keywords: 
mobile
Keywords: 
research
Keywords: 
museum community
Keywords: 
international
Keywords: 
future
Keywords: 
survey
Abstract: 

If the future is mobile, how is the museum community experiencing that future, what are their ambitions within it, and in which areas is further knowledge share required?  It was specifically to gain an insight into questions such as these that the 2010 International Museums and Mobile survey was developed.  This paper will present and analyse the responses of the 600+ museum professi

Type: 
Paper - in formal session

The Transition to Online Scholarly Catalogues

Keywords: 
online
Keywords: 
research
Keywords: 
publication
Keywords: 
digital
Keywords: 
Catalogue
Keywords: 
print
Abstract: 

The scholarly catalogue has long been a critical part of a museum's mission, providing authoritative information about collection objects for scholars, students, and the general public. Often based on years of painstaking research and richly illustrated, print catalogues form one of the building blocks of art history.

Type: 
Paper - in formal session
Authors: