Museums and the Web

An annual conference exploring the social, cultural, design, technological, economic, and organizational issues of culture, science and heritage on-line.

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About You

First Name
Maurice
Last Name
Berger
Job Title
Research Professor
Department
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture
Institution
University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Maurice Berger's picture

Your Background

Your Biography

Maurice Berger is Research Professor at the Center for Art, Design, and Visual Culture, University of Maryland Baltimore County and Senior Fellow at the Vera List Center for Art and Politics of The New School. His writings on art, television, film, law, and the politics and culture of race in America have appeared in many journals and newspapers, including Artforum, Art in America, The New York Times, The Village Voice, October, Wired, and The Los Angeles Times. He is the author of the critically acclaimed White Lies: Race and the Myths of Whiteness (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1999)—which was named as a finalist for the 2000 Horace Mann Bond Book Award of Harvard University—and ten other books, including Labyrinths: Robert Morris, Minimalism, and the 1960s (Harper & Row, 1989), How Art Becomes History (HarperCollins, 1992), Constructing Masculinity (Routledge, 1995), The Crisis of Criticism (The New Press, 1998), and Masterworks of the Jewish Museum (with Joan Rosenbaum, Yale, 2004), and For All The World To See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights (Yale, 2010).

Berger is the recipient of numerous honors, including grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities, the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award from Boston University School of Social Work, “Exhibition of the Year, 2008” from the Association of Art Museum Curators, and “Best Thematic Exhibition in New York, 2008” from the International Association of Art Critics, American Section.

Berger has engaged the Internet in his curatorial and scholarly practices, including a series of three innovative online conferences (later published as books) on the George O'Keeffe Museum Research Center website--"Postmodernism" [2001], "Museums of Tomorrow" [2003], "The 1980s" [2005]. He moderated the earliest online conference on race and American race relations(1993, Whitney/Echo New York), and, most recently, produced an extensive and comprehensive companion website for his exhibition, For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights—a joint venture of the National Museum of African American History and Culture of the Smithsonian Institution and CADVC. The exhibition opened at the International Center of Photography in New York in 2010, and will travel to five additional venues, including the DuSable Museum of African American History, Smithsonian National Museum of American History, CADVC, The Addison Gallery of American Art, and the Nevada Art Museum.

Berger has curated more than 25 exhibitions, including retrospectives of the artists Adrian Piper (1999) and Fred Wilson (2001), both traveling extensively in the United States and Canada. Berger has advocated for more aggressive educational outreach and broader cultural and social context for art in museums, creating multi-media context galleries for numerous exhibitions, including Action/Abstraction: Pollock, de Kooning, and American Art, 1940-1976, Jewish Museum (2008) and Black Male: Representations of Masculinity, 1968-1994 (1994) and The American Century: Art & Culture, 1950-2000, (1999), both at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Additionally, he was the curator of Hands and Minds: The Art and Writing of Young People in 20th-Century America, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. (1998), an exhibition, and a catalog with a preface by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, on the importance of arts education that traveled across the United States.

Best of the Web History

2011 Vote
For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights
2011 Nomination
For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights

History

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