Visiting Illinois Distributed Museum Coordinator

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign seeks an innovative and motivated professional for the position of Visiting Illinois Distributed Museum Coordinator. Reporting to the Assistant University Archivist, this visiting academic professional position will oversee a campus-wide editorial process to develop content for the Illinois Distributed Museum (http://distributedmuseum.illinois.edu/), a website for telling the story of innovation at the University. The successful candidate will receive, edit, and make available digital archival content from campus units; coordinate communication and effort between project stakeholders in the University Archives/Library, the Spurlock Museum, and the iSchool; and oversee website development with technical staff in the Library.

For more information and to apply, please visit

https://jobs.illinois.edu/academic-job-board/job-details?jobID=76476&job=visiting-distributed-museum-coordinator-preservation-university-library-a1700316

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About sfranken

Susan Frankenberg is the coordinator for the interdisciplinary Museum Studies Program and a graduate faculty member (Anthropology) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She has also served as interim director of the Spurlock Museum, the world cultures museum on campus, and is an active member of CHAMP (the Collaborative for Cultural Heritage Management and Policy). Prior to coming to the University of Illinois in 2007, she was Curator of Archaeology and a Research Assistant Professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and the Frank H. McClung Museum. An archaeologist and bioanthropologist by training, she has also worked as a consulting archaeologist in the private, governmental and non-profit sectors, and as a data analyst for a biomedical foundation. Her research in and on museums focuses on understanding how contemporary museums vary in their structures and functions, and how people use museums across different geopolitical, cultural and other contexts. Her research in archaeology and bioanthropology involves use of Bayesian and maximum likelihood estimation methods in studies of human demography, health and migration in the past.